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Using eyelets

To use eyelets you will need a hole punch and a universal setter. Using a hammer and the hole punch, make the hole where you want to place your eyelet. Place the eyelet in the hole and turn over the cardstock/paper so the front of your eyelet is face down. Place the universal setter in the back of the eyelet and hit several times with the hammer until the eyelet has flattened and is secure.


Note: Aluminium eyelets require only a gentle hammering while some of the shaped eyelets, made from brass, can be hit harder to set.

Adirondack Alcohol InksUsing Tim Holtz Adirondack Alcohol Inks

Alcohol Inks are acid free, fast drying transparent dye inks specially formulated to create a colourful, polished stone effect. Use on glossy paper, dominoes, metal, shrink plastic, glass, and other slick surfaces. Alcohol Blending Solution is available for lightening colours and cleaning inks from non-porous surfaces. Before you start working, lay down your Non-stick Craft Sat, which provides protection to a crafter's work surface for many craft mediums.

To use inks, cut a piece of glossy paper the size you want. Then drop alcohol inks onto your felt applicator. How big you make the areas of ink and how far apart they are will affect the end result. Add several different inks and a metallic mixitive if you like and dab onto your paper. If you want a background with more subtle colors, use less alcohol ink and add some blending solution to your applicator. The blending solution separates the metallic inks out more than just using the alcohol inks alone.

To see a video demonstration of Tim Holtz using the alcohol inks, click here




Cuttlebug machine


Using Spellbinders Dies in the Cuttlebug Machine

How do I use a Spellbinders die to cut in the CuttleBug?

Create a sandwich in the following order from the bottom up:
1. A plate.
2. C plate.
3. Spellbinders die (cutting side or ridged side up).
4. Paper or cardstock.
5. B plate.
6. Run through Cuttlebug machine.

* If embossing right after cutting remove the C Plate for embossing sandwich.

SpellbindersHow do I use a Spellbinders Die to emboss in the CuttleBug?
You will need a Spellbinders Tan Embossing Mat to emboss in the Cuttlebug machine. Create an "embossing sandwich" using the following, stacking from the bottom up.

1. Place A plate on bottom.
2. Leave die face up on A plate with die cut still in the die.
3. Place one Spellbinders Tan Embossing Mat on top of the die.
4. Use 2 or 3 pieces of cardstock to shim (create a little more bulk).

*Cautionary Note: Using more than 3 pieces of cardstock to shim Cuttlebug embossing sandwich will result in B plate breakage. When using Spellbinders Edgeabilities card making dies, shim with only 2 pieces of cardstock.
5. Place two acrylic B plates on top of the sandwich and run through the Cuttlebug machine to emboss Spellbinders die cuts.
6. Turn die over and use like a stencil with inks and chalks for added detail. 

Cuttlebug Tips and Techniques

*For an interesting card effect, you can ink your embossing folders by using either a brayer or by rubbing the ink pad straight onto the inside of your folder. Do not use a permanent ink - use an ink such as Brilliance, which will wash off easily afterwards. The raised embossed area of the design will remain white and the background will be inked.

*Another way of using ink with the folder is to emboss your folder as per normal and thn use a sponge to dab into you ink pad and then over the embossed card, which will put ink on the embossed bits. You can also chalk over the embossed area.

Distress InkUsing Tim Holtz Distress Inks
Key points that make Distress Inks different:

Stay wet longer: Allows you to blend and shade on photos and paper - also emboss. Other dye inks dry too fast, especially on photos, so you end up with lines and marks if you go direct from the pad.

Colour wicks or spreads out: These inks will travel across the surface of your paper when spritzed with water. Other dyes do not travel as much although they might bleed a little when wet. The Distress Inks actually wick or spread out much further, creating several tone on tones.

Colour stability: The colours of the Distress Inks will not break down when wet or heated, allowing you to have more colour control for the finished look. Other brown coloured dyes will break down when water is added, leaving a pink and green hue.

Colour palette: Unlike any other colours of inks you've seen. 

Tim Holtz's Distress Tips

Use water when distressing. It gives the papers more of a weathered texture. Working on any type of paper (manila, cardstock, or text weight), crumple the paper up. Always press in the centre of any heavyweight cardstock or manila stock - this will break the surface tension of the paper and allow you to crumple the paper easier without tearing it. Next, rub the Distress pads over the surface - you can work with several different colours or just one. Walnut Stain is ideal for this. Then spray the inked surface with water (you will immediately notice the ink travels outward when water is applied as these inks are designed to react with water). Heat the surface to dry - and here's why... Although you don't have to heat set these inks for any reason, dry the water using either a heat tool or an iron. This will allow for more tone control and keep areas dark and others light. Ironing the paper will also give you a much smoother surface to stamp on without compromising the aged finish.

*If you allow the surface to air-dry, most of your colour will end up on the edges only because the paper will bend and buckle when wet, forcing the ink and water to the edges. Notice that these Distress Inks retain their colour value even when wet and dried. Other brown dyes will break down in colour (sometimes leaving a pink and green hue).

Double distress tags: Crumple tag and apply two colours (one new tone and one original tone) of Distress Inks directly from the pads to each crumpled tag. Spray with water and dry.

Wrinkle-free distressing: To create the look of aged papers from times gone by, without all the lines and wrinkles, give this a try. Working on your Non-stick Craft Sheet, begin by directly applying various colours of Distress Ink Pads to the surface of the craft sheet. A couple of swipes of a colour or two will do the trick (you might also try using an original colour of Distress Ink along with a new one). Get out your Distress Re-Inkers for this next step as you want to add a bit of intense colour for the ultimate vintage look. Try Walnut Stain or Vintage Photo for this - remove the glass dropper from the bottle and drag it across the inked craft sheet. Do not squeeze any drops of ink as it will take over everything! Next, mist the craft sheet with water to allow the inks to begin mixing and blending - usually 3-4 sprays is plenty. Then, take your paper or tag and place it directly on the inked craft sheet and lift it off. If you have any un-inked areas, simply place that area of the paper on any left over inks on the sheet. Finally, dry your paper or tag using an iron or a heat tool. To finish your attic-fresh look, ink the edges with Distress Inks using a piece of Cut n' Dry Foam.

For stamping: These inks can be used for many stamping applications. The special formulation on these Distress Inks provides a versatile finish on papers, yet still allows for normal stamping applications. Try stamping on uncoated (matte) papers and immediately rub the image with a cloth - this will soften or shadow your image without smudging any detail. Vintage Photo, Walnut Stain, Tea Dye and Black Soot are wonderful for doing
this. Another surface is glossy cardstock - keep in mind this is a different type of dye ink so when you stamp on glossy, certain areas of your image will bead up, once again providing a distressed look without you doing a thing (a fantastic look with some areas of the image appearing pitted). Brayering on glossy cardstock is also wonderful because you can still manipulate the inks with different tools, brushes, your fingers etc. Even after the ink is applied you can achieve amazing texture and colour shading.

On photos: Finally, an ink formulated for photos! Whether you're a scrapbooker or not, you can use all types of photos (vintage or new ones) on your cards and pages. The Distress Inks work on all types of photos - inkjet, laser, toner copies, regular photos (matte or glossy) and even colour photos. Start by using the lightest colours, such as Antique Linen or Old Paper, with either a brayer or direct to photo. Cover the photo in the lighter colours and blend the colours with a small piece of Cut n' Dry Foam after you apply the inks - these inks stay wet long enough for you to blend out any lines or marks other ink pads leave on photos. Next, age the edges with Vintage Photo or Walnut Stain by applying the pad directly to the edges - soften and mix the tones with a small piece of Ranger Cut `n Dry Foam. To complete the aged process, lightly sand - yes, sand - the photo with medium grit sand paper. Don't go over anyone's face, but just make a few scratches here and there. 

Punch Around the Page placement

To get placement right for Martha Stewart Punch Around the Page punches, click on this link.

http://images.marthastewart.com/images/channel/corporate/shop/generic/2009Q3/loops_howto.pdf


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